Egypt, Between, A, Frying, Pan, And, A, Fire, Africa, Human Rights, Religion
Egypt is burning in the fires of a tried and failed system of governance

Egypt: Between A Frying Pan And A Fire

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Over the past three years, Egypt has been going through a tumultuous and violent revolution.

First, Egyptians rose up in arms against their military-cum-’civilian’ dictator Hosni Mubarak. After many bloody battles, on the ground and off it, they successfully removed him, his military, and their army of cronies from power.

The revolution was not failing. It was being raped by pious acolytes

The problem was that after a period of uncertainty, unrest and interim confusion, power fell in the hands of religious fanatics, headed by Mohamed Morsi.

In one measly year, under the Muslim Brotherhood’s administration, the country went further down the drain.

It was a very short feat, bearing in mind how low Egypt had already been. The sky was the limit and yet Morsi and his brothers managed to sink the country even lower.

The revolution was not failing. It was being raped by pious acolytes.

Luckily there was a counterinsurgency. The people rose up again and removed the Muslim Brotherhood and all organized religion from power.

The problem was that they reinstated the army.

Out of the frying pan and into the fire — and back into the frying pan!

Egypt is an old place filled with proud people. It should know better than trade slave driver for slave driver. Like all countries, it is better off having both the army and religion kept away from hard power. Neither of them have any place in politics and state administration.

There is a reason why most countries have separated church and state, and that is because the practice works

See, there is a reason why most countries have separated church and state, and that is because the practice works. Just as the state is a lousy spiritual guide, religion is a lousy political administrator. Just as the state cannot maintain strict military discipline, the army cannot run a fully functioning country.

The army should thus focus on military matters, as militaries are supposed to do, and organized religion should return to matters of spirit and faith, allowing its local denominations to practice their beliefs within it, so long as they do not impede on, persecute, or harm others.

Both should leave polity to politics and state ministering to state administration. Egypt will be much better off for it, and so will the rest of the world.