The longing to commune with nature and to remove oneself from the perpetual hum of city life has been a longstanding human tradition. In 1845, Thoreau lived in a cabin for two years because he: “wished to live deliberately… and see if I could not learn what it had to teach, and not, when I came to die, discover that I had not lived.”

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blmiers2 via Flickr

Source: blmiers2 via Flickr

What I needed was the moon and the wind, and the shore and the ocean, and the mountains and the worn rocks.

The longing to commune with nature and to remove oneself from the perpetual hum of city life has been a longstanding human tradition. In 1845, Thoreau left the city hub to escape to the solitude of Walden Pond where he lived in a cabin for two years. This was all because he:

“wished to live deliberately… and see if I could not learn what it had to teach, and not, when I came to die, discover that I had not lived.”

A more recent example in 2007 comes from the almost mythological story behind the recording of Justin Vernon’s album For Emma, Forever Ago. All areas of his life were not as he had hoped, so Vernon moved back to Wisconsin and relocated to his father’s hunting cabin where he eventually recorded the songs that would comprise his debut solo album.

It’s when we are depleted from our interactions with the concrete do we seem to crave nature for its restorative properties. That’s when we go looking for our line – line is the division between relative normalcy and something exceptional. The division between who we are and who we were always meant to be. Its crossing may be tentative at first as an uncertain toe extends over the threshold, over that unknown barrier that inexplicably holds us back. We hear that sense of sensibility in our heads that sometimes need to be quelled in order to live out our dreams and to precariously toe that line.

I cannot deny it must be shared with those I love through mutual touch like a common DNA

What unites us as human beings is our ethereal bond with the natural forces that we are constantly at the mercy of. No matter where we are living, whether it may be in cities, towns, or parishes, our environment always affects us. It affects our mood as our vitamin D levels are depleted and we delve into a sort of winter-induced sadness (this phenomenon is conveniently called SAD). It affects as we battle it out in the cold with layers upon layers, or as we retreat to our air conditioned dwellings in hopes of escaping the sweltering heat. It’s not surprising that weather and music are some of the ‘safe’ topics where most people can find a commonality. ‘Revelation, A Visual Poem’ truly reveals not only our bond with nature, but through its viewing, the effect that visuals and music have on our mood. Personally, by the end of this video, I feel positively euphoric.