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Lessons From a Bee

No matter how productive we think we are with our Fordist assembly lines and Tayloristic work ethic, we can never compete with the worker bee.

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No matter how productive we think we are with our Fordist assembly lines and Tayloristic work ethic, we can never compete with the worker bee. Instead of competing, we have learned to harness the bee’s energy to have a little bit for ourselves the liquid currency of sweet nectar.

Beekeeping is not normally something associated with urban life, but a drop in the bee population across North America and questionable food quality has resulted in a surge of urban harvesters. Unbeknownst to many, these urban beekeepers tend to their hives on top of the Fairmont Royal York Hotel in Toronto and even on the Eiffel Tower in Paris. Despite these urban locations, the bees are resourceful and find plants in the seemingly limited green space.

Luckily, bees have inspired people to be even more enterprising when it comes to the use of urban green space. Downsview park in Toronto is such a place and has been transformed into a mecca of urban farming. This is the compromise between the benefits of the city and country, as city dwellers become more self-sustaining by growing their own crops. It also ushers in a new breed of farmer who works and plays in the city, but who has the option of retreating to their own small green space. It is doubtful that rural farmers will be replaced by their urban counterparts; city farmers compliment the work that rural farmers do, not hinder it. These agricultural city initiatives also provide awareness for people who may have been overlooked in the past; luckily, population density is no longer a determinate of agricultural success.

The video below features the typical procedures of rural beekeeping: