Matt Tomasulo is beginning to become somewhat of a regular here on Urban Times because of his innovative and interactive ways of reclaiming urban spaces and his ability to create dialogues about the places where we live. Now Matt is back with his latest project, Walk [Your City].

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Image Credit: Walk (Your City) - http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/cityfabric/walk-your-city

Matt Tomasulo is beginning to become somewhat of a regular here on Urban Times because of his innovative and interactive ways of reclaiming urban spaces and his ability to create dialogues about the places where we live. Just to recap, Matt is the mastermind behind CityFabric, a crowdfunded (via Kickstarter) success story which inspires conversations about place formed around city figureground maps printed onto t-shirts and totes. Matt also spearheaded the Walk Raleigh movement, a venture in guerrilla urbanism via wayfinding which encouraged pedestrians to reclaim the urban environment.

Now Matt is back with his latest project, Walk [Your City]. At this point the project is collecting funds via Kickstarter and if funded (which seems highly likely given that the project is already nearing 1/3 of its funding goal with 26 days to go) the project will create an opportunity for users to log on and create their own signs which provide directions (and a QR code for more information) to walkable destinations within their city. The signs (which will look like the ones in the pictures above and below) will allow users to take advantage of Open Source ideology as a means of creating urban spaces which are more informative and pedestrian friendly. Essentially, the project involves creation of a generic template which can be customized for local destinations in order to continue the momentum of guerrilla wayfinding started by the Walk Raleigh project in other cities around the world.

Image credit: Walk (Your City) - http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/cityfabric/walk-your-city

Image credit: Walk (Your City) - http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/cityfabric/walk-your-city

I encourage you to go over to the Kickstarter page to have a look at Matt’s video (it’s well produced and he was kind enough to give a graphic shoutout to Urban Times) and to get more information on the project.  While we often look for a top-down approach to many of the problems that plague cities today, there is still a lot of untapped opportunity for citizens to take control of their communities and make bold (and brash) statements regarding what they want from their community. Projects such as Walk [Your City] demonstrate that creating place which suits the needs of the people that live there doesn’t have to be as hard as we make.